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Pet travel to Europe after Brexit.

It is still unclear as to when the UK will leave Europe and  which agreements will be in place. This depends on whether we leave with a deal or not.

PLEASE REFER TO https://www.gov.uk/guidance/pet-travel-to-europe-after-brexit FOR THE MOST UP TO DATE INFORMATION AS THE ADVICE CAN CHANGE QUICKLY

The following information was valid on March 25th 2019

Pet travel requirements will change depending on what category of third country the UK becomes on the day the UK leaves the EU. Third countries can apply to the European Commission to be listed. The UK is likely to be treated as an unlisted country under the EU Pet Travel Scheme if it leaves the EU without a deal.

Pet travel if the UK is an unlisted country

A current EU pet passport issued in the UK will not be valid for travel to the EU.

You’ll need to take the following steps:

  1. You must have your dog, cat or ferret microchipped and vaccinated against rabies before it can travel. Your pet must have a blood sample taken at least 30 days after its last rabies vaccination. Your vet may recommend a booster rabies vaccination before this test.
  2. Your vet must send the blood sample to an EU-approved blood testing laboratory.
  3. The results of the blood test must show a rabies antibody level of at least 0.5 IU/ml.
  4. You must wait 3 months from the date the successful blood sample was taken before you travel.
  5. The vet must give you a copy of the test results and enter the day the blood sample was taken in an animal health certificate.

You might find that the blood test result is not successful despite your pet being up to date with its rabies vaccinations. If this happens you’ll need a repeat vaccination and blood test taken at least 30 days after the repeat vaccination.

Find out more about rabies vaccination boosters and blood tests.

Dogs travelling from the UK to EU listed tapeworm free countries (Finland, Ireland and Malta) should be treated for tapeworm before travel.

You will not be able to travel with your pet if you have not completed these steps.

Get a health certificate

You must also take your pet to an official vet no more than 10 days before travel to get an animal health certificate.

You must take proof of:

  • your pet’s vaccination history
  • your pet’s microchipping date
  • a successful rabies antibody blood test result
  • tapeworm treatment if travelling to Finland, Ireland or Malta

Your pet’s animal health certificate will be valid for:

  • 10 days after the date of issue for entry into the EU
  • onward travel within the EU for 4 months after the date of issue
  • re-entry to the UK for 4 months after the date of issue

On arrival in the EU, pet owners travelling with pets will need to enter through a designated Travellers’ points of entry (TPE). At the TPE, you may need to present proof of microchip, rabies vaccination, successful blood test results and tapeworm treatment (if required) with your pet’s health certificate.

Repeat trips to the EU

Pets that have previously had a successful blood test and have an up-to-date subsequent rabies vaccination history do not need to repeat the blood test.

Your pet will need a new health certificate for each trip to the EU.

To get a new health certificate you must take your pet to an official vet no more than 10 days before you travel. Again, you must show proof of your pet’s:

  • microchipping date
  • rabies vaccination history
  • successful rabies antibody blood test result
  • tapeworm treatment if travelling to Malta, Ireland or Finland

Return to the UK

Your pet must have one of the following documents when returning to the UK:

  • an EU pet passport (issued in the EU or in the UK prior to EU Exit)
  • the animal health certificate issued in the UK used to travel to the EU (which you can use up to 4 months after it was issued)
  • a UK pet health certificate (for travel into the UK only)

Check the routes before you travel. On existing approved routes your documents and microchip will be checked. If you’re not travelling on an approved route talk to your vet about what preparations you need to make before travel.

On approved routes, before you enter Great Britain (GB), your pet’s microchip and documents will need to be checked to ensure they meet the necessary health requirements.

There will be no change to the current health preparations for pets entering GB from the EU after Exit.

You do not have to travel on an approved route if you travel to England, Scotland or Wales from:

  • UK countries
  • the Channel Islands
  • the Isle of Man
  • the Republic of Ireland

Travel from countries not free from tapeworm (Echinococcus multilocularis)

You need to take your dog to a vet no less than 24 hours and no more than 120 hours (5 days) before entering the UK for an approved tapeworm treatment. This requirement won’t change after the UK leaves the EU.

You don’t need to treat your dog for tapeworm if you’re coming directly to the UK from Finland, Ireland or Malta.

UK nationals living in the EU

If you’re living in the EU and plan to travel with your pet using a UK-issued pet passport, you should speak to your local vet. They’ll be able to help you understand the impact of EU Exit and ensure you’re compliant with EU Pet Travel Regulations.

If you have a pet passport issued by an EU member state, you can use it to bring your pet to the UK.

You can also use it to return to the EU, as long as your pet has had a successful rabies antibody blood test. You must make sure the blood test is taken at least 30 days after the date of rabies vaccination.

If the blood sample is taken in the UK you must wait 3 months from the date the successful blood sample was taken before you travel back to the EU. You don’t have to wait the 3 months before travelling if your pet has a successful blood test before leaving the EU.

If the UK becomes a listed third country

Third countries have to apply to the European Commission to be listed under either Part 1 or Part 2 of Annex II to EU Pet Travel Regulations.

A small number of countries and territories are Part 1 listed. They operate under the same EU Pet Travel Scheme rules as EU member states but with a different type of pet passport. Most countries are Part 2 listed, which means there are different requirements for travelling with your pet.

You’ll need to obtain documents that will replace the EU pet passport from an official vet. The type of document you need depends on whether the UK becomes a Part 1 or Part 2 listed country.

Part 1 listed country status

If the UK becomes a Part 1 listed country, you must have your pet microchipped and vaccinated against rabies before travel. You will need to make sure your pet’s rabies vaccinations are kept up to date and make sure your dog has tapeworm treatment if needed.

You must also apply for a new document, the UK pet passport. You’ll be able to use this for travel to the EU for your pet’s lifetime (or until full) as long as your pet’s rabies vaccinations are kept up to date.

Part 2 listed country status

If the UK becomes a Part 2 listed country, you must have your pet microchipped and vaccinated against rabies before travel. You’ll need to make sure your pet’s rabies vaccinations are kept up to date and make sure your dog has tapeworm treatment if needed.

You must also visit an official vet no more than 10 days before you travel to get an animal health certificate confirming that your pet is microchipped and vaccinated against rabies.

Your pet will need a new animal health certificate for each trip to the EU if the UK becomes a Part 2 listed country. On arrival in the EU, pet owners travelling with pets need to enter through a designated TPE. At the TPE, you may need to present proof of microchip and rabies vaccination and tapeworm treatment if required.

Pet travel during an implementation period

If a deal is agreed and an implementation period is confirmed, you’ll be able to travel with your pet to the EU under the current pet travel rules using your current EU pet passport.

If you’re travelling with your pet for the first time you’ll have to visit your vet to get a pet passport.

About the author

Fenton Vets

Havefordwest Practice

Fenton Vets

21 Portfield, 
Haverfordwest, 
Pembrokeshire SA61 1BN

Email. admin@fentonvets.co.uk

Small Animals:
(01437) 762806
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Pemboke Dock Practice

Fenton Vets

Unit B,
London Road Shopping Mall,
Kingswood Trading Estate,
London Road,
Pembroke Dock,
SA72 4RS

Email. admin@fentonvets.co.uk

Tel: (01646) 622010

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